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grade yourself

October 24, 2011 Leave a comment Go to comments

Last month, I attended the Making of Champions 2011 Conference organized by RCCG House of Praise, Mississauga. It was an amazing event in which speakers such as Clive Pick, Dr. Mensah Otabil, Randall Pickett, Rev. Sam Adeyemi, Dr. Sam Chand and Pstr. Wale Akinsiku came to teach on topics ranging from entrepreneurship to finance, leadership to spiritual growth over a four week period.

I missed the first three weeks of the event; not knowing about it until the fourth week. I was upset to learn I missed Dr. Otabil and Mr. Pickett’s seminars. I’ve heard a lot about Dr. Otabil and his insightful teachings; and I’ve known about Mr. Pickett since I bought his book, The Campus CEO in the summer of 2008. I wasn’t too upset about missing some of the others. For example, I’ve already had the pleasure of sitting through Clive Pick and Dr. Sam Chand’s teachings at two seminars held by my church, RCCG Restoration House, Hamilton.

Anyway, the final Guest Speaker was going to be Rev. Sam Adeyemi. I’d heard a lot about his teaching and ministry since before I initially left Nigeria, but never got around to attending a Sunday service at the Daystar Christian Centre, Lagos. Naturally, when I heard he would be speaking, I had to attend the program. There were four programs – Friday Night Ministration, Business Breakfast Meeting, Saturday Night Ministration and the Making of Champions Thanksgiving Sunday Service.

I went for the Friday Night Ministration and his teaching was quite insightful. During his sermon, he mentioned his mandate is to help/teach people to succeed in every facet of their lives; so when it was announced that he would be the keynote speaker at the Business Breakfast Meeting, I jumped at the opportunity immediately and paid for a ticket.

I had the opportunity to network with a lot of business people in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) that Saturday morning. At first, it was a little intimidating because I was probably among the top 10 youngest people at the function, but there was no discrimination or anything of that sort, so it was easy to mingle and chat. It was money very well spent, and definitely worth more than I paid for.

Amongst the many topics he spoke/taught on is what I will share with you today – an assessment of your entrepreneurship level. Before the lecture, we were all handed a form. In it was a set nine questions. These nine questions ask questions that help assess one grade him/herself as an entrepreneur. It was pretty easy and straight forward. All we had to do was individually grade yourselves by circling between from 1 and 7 (1 being seldom and 7 being almost always) which describes you best for all the questions, sum up your scores and find your level based on the total.

I have a attached a copy of the form below; you can download it and fill for yourself.

As seen in the form, a total between 1 – 20 means you may need some mentoring, a total between 21 – 40 means you have opportunities for growth, a total between 41 – 60 means you are an entrepreneur in the making, and a total between  61 – 70 means you are an entrepreneur. From what I gathered, those in the 1 – 20 group are people who have the entrepreneurial spirit, but need some guidance and mentoring in order to build  and nurture their spirit. Those in the 21 – 40 group are the determined people still trying to find their footing or those who have begun their journey. Those in the 41 – 60 group are the people who are well on their way, but still have room from improvement. Finally, those in the 61 – 70 group are the people already entrepreneurs, continually expanding and exploring new avenues. If you notice, the highest possible score is 63 and not 70; that’s because no one is the perfect entrepreneur, and there’s always room for expansion and/or improvement. I scored 53 in mine; which places me in the entrepreneur in the making category 🙂

It was a great meeting. I also bought one of his books, The Parable of Dollars. May be I’ll share some of the knowledge I gain from there when I’m done with it. If you ever can make it to a seminar where he will be speaking, I strongly recommend you attend. I’ll leave you with something he mentioned I think is profound – “Not everyone can have a business, some people have to be the employees. Only people with an entrepreneurial mindset determine how far they go and what they can accomplish. Also, not every business person is an entrepreneur; an entrepreneur is someone who creates products and services that meet the needs of people for a profit. Entrepreneurs meet needs and get paid for it. Find a need, ask God to reveal the solution to you and provide you with the means to execute it.”

I think it is important to note that no matter the level you are or have attained, there is still an element of growth potential. Never get too comfortable everywhere you are. I hope my posts continue to be helpful. Cheers!

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  1. Dinky
    November 18, 2011 at 4:02 pm

    Everyone hoping to be an entrepreneur should use this rating scale 🙂

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